In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500

Slower Streets


Canberra’s suburban streets are experiencing a walking and cycling boom. The ACT Government is working with local residents’ groups to encourage people to slow down and share the road with their neighbours who are walking and cycling.

Restrictions on organised sport and other activities, means more people are staying local: working, shopping and exercising in their suburb and more people on our suburban streets.

With physical distancing here to stay for the foreseeable future, Slower Streets has been developed to assist people who are walking and cycling and may need to use some of the road for exercise.

Slower Streets is an initiative developed in partnership with walking and cycling groups and delivered by residential organisations and networks to encourage people to slow down and look out for their neighbours.

Slower Streets has not changed speed limits. It is just an invitation to look out for each other.

The initiative also asks visitors, who may use suburban roads to and from their work, appointments and play, to check their speed and to slow down.

The ACT Government will provide signs and some basic guidance about how to place them.

Local residential communities can then install the signage according to local circumstances and may do additional communications about walking and cycling locally.

Slower Streets is being rolled out in Ainslie, Aranda, Braddon, Crace, Downer, Farrer, Garran, O’Connor, Watson, Weston and Yarralumla.

More suburbs are welcome to also come on board.

To register or for more information, contact TCCS.ActiveTravel@act.gov.au and we will get you started.

How to get involved

The ACT Government is making corflute signs available and providing guidance to residents about appropriate placement of the signs. We are starting on a limited basis to enable us to provide resources to communities that wish to give it a try.

We believe that residents are best placed to decide if and how this works in their local suburb. Contact your local community organisation or network if you would like your suburb to participate. If they are not already considering joining in, offer to coordinate for your suburb.

It can be as much or as little as you like. At the very least you will need to:

  • Think about how Slower Streets might work in your suburb.
  • Register your interest with the Active Travel Office and discuss where you will put the signs. We expect you will only need about 10.
  • Install the signage around your suburb.
  • Be willing to discuss the initiative with your neighbours using your communication channels (newsletters, social media etc).
  • Provide us will feedback about how it is going in your suburb.

To register or for more information, contact TCCS.ActiveTravel@act.gov.au and we will get you started.

Frequently asked questions

Why do we need to slow down on residential streets at this time?

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, more people are walking and cycling in their suburb and they are giving each other more space. Slower Streets has been developed to assist neighbourhoods who are walking and cycling and may need to use some of the road for exercise.

Why are there more people walking and cycling on residential streets?

There are a range of factors increasing walking and cycling on residential streets. One factor is the current restrictions on organised sport and other activities. Also, many people are following the advice to avoid unnecessary travel by working from home and visiting their local shops, avoiding large shopping centres.

Slowing down helps to contribute to safer and friendlier neighbourhood streets.

This is not an enforceable requirement. It is simply a request to people driving to be on the look-out for their neighbours who are walking and cycling through residential streets.

Will it be safe to walk or cycle on the road?

People who are walking or cycling are still encouraged to be vigilant looking and listening for motor vehicles. If you are walking on the road, the ACT Road Rules Handbook suggests you walk on the right hand side so you can see oncoming traffic. Check out our other guidance about sharing roads and paths.